First curve and EMOTIONS

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (The Main Forum)' started by Hales + Comet, Mar 17, 2019.

  1. Hales + Comet

    Hales + Comet Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2019
    We are doing our first curve tomorrow and I am so nervous that I will do something wrong. If anyone has tips or advice that would be greatly appreciated.

    On another note.... I thought I was doing so well I finally got comet eating again and we are on day 10 since his diagnosis day 8 on insulin and we were cruising. However, today it all just hit me and I felt stressed and exhausted and so overwhelmed has anyone else experienced this? Does it ever get easier?
     
  2. Bron and Sheba

    Bron and Sheba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2015
    Yes it does get much easier.... it becomes just routine. Maybe you have finally relaxed and you realise how tired you are. It is a steep learning curve in the beginning but it gets much better.
    Do you have a Spreadsheet? I can’t see one.
    To do the curve test at AMPS as you usually do and record BSL. Feed and give insulin. Then at +2 +4 +6 +8 +10 and PMPS take the BSL and record. Feed throughout the day as you normally do. If you find that the numbers are dropping low around the nadir (lowest point in the cycle) you could do another test for example a test at say +7 to check they are not dropping too low.
    Good luck. You will do well.
     
  3. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    You're doing really well, give yourself credit! The main thng I'd add to what Bron has said is... try to relax, make today about things other than just testing every two hours - listen to your favourite music, watch a film, read a book, eat some tasty snacks. Ir's easy to get bogged down in the mechanics and emotions of doing a curve, so you need to feel as chilled and balanced as possible.
    Yes, it really does become much better. It's a learning curve and you're already well on your way.
    Good luck!
     
  4. Hales + Comet

    Hales + Comet Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2019
    we don't have our spreasheet set up yet I am going to do that today. The vet also didn's want us taking BG every day as she felt he would be fine and it would just add to the stress.
     
  5. Bron and Sheba

    Bron and Sheba Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2015
    I disagree with your vet on not testing every day.
    To keep Hales safe I would highly recommend you test before EVERY Preshot to make sure it is safe to do so and mid cycle to see how low the insulin is taking Hales. Not every cycle is the same. It won’t hurt Hales and it will keep him safe. By the time cats start exhibiting signs and symptoms of a hypo, they are very low. Testing can catch them before they drop to dangerous levels.
     
    Noah & me (GA) and Amina&M'row like this.
  6. Idjit's mom

    Idjit's mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 3, 2018
    I agree with Bron, my vet only recommended testing midday, two or three times a week, not even pre-shot tests. I happened to test and Idjit was going too low, scared the pants off me. Testing and knowing what to do in the case of a hypo is critical.
     
  7. Molly and Sammy

    Molly and Sammy Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2018
    Also, the more you test, the easier it gets for you and your kitty. Occasional random pokes don't keep him safe or get you both used to the procedure. I really struggled with this when Sammy was diagnosed six months ago. I'm 70, have a tremor, and don't see well. But reading the tips, watching the videos, and sheer repetition got us over the tough days. Sammy loves his freeze dried chicken treats, which he ONLY gets with tests. I test preshots always, and almost always get a bedtime check to be sure he's not dropping too low. Curves about twice a week, since he's not quite regulated and I'm home a lot. Today I was going to give his ears a break, but no! Every two hours, jumping up on the couch for a test/treat. You can do this!
     
  8. Elizabeth and Bertie

    Elizabeth and Bertie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2010
    That is such a great post. Really warmed my heart to read this. :bighug::bighug::bighug:
     
    Amina&M'row and Molly and Sammy like this.
  9. Molly and Sammy

    Molly and Sammy Member

    Joined:
    Sep 1, 2018
    Were it not for this group I would have given up in the first week. I swear you all saved Sammy's life by empowering me with information and encouragement. And looking back, I don't think I would have survived emotionally had I not kept trying. It's Team Sammy these days, and he's doing great.
     
  10. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    I agree! Lovely positive attitude! :)
     
  11. Diana&Tom

    Diana&Tom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Team Sammy! Love it!
     
  12. Daddy Jack's Mommy

    Daddy Jack's Mommy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    This is so absolutely true! It's the frequency of doing the tests that makes them become routine and easier--if not completely easy for many owners and their sugar babies. I'm new to this (although I did have a diabetic cat years ago that I NEVER tested, and it makes me cringe to remember this now.) When I began poking Jack's ears and getting no blood for days, I never would have believed that less than 4 weeks later it would feel this easy to do. I had a friend here the other night, when I was getting ready to test Jack. I do in the bathroom (away from the other 4 goofy felines and in a room where Jack frequently sleeps). As I walked towards the bathroom with the meter and my glasses in my hand, Jack meandered down the hall after me. My friend was shocked. He said, "Are you telling me that he follows you into that room to have his ear poked?" Yep. That's exactly what I'm saying. It's the doing it, and doing it, and doing it that makes it become natural.
    And yes! NOT doing it is not a good option for our own mental well being, because we all love these fur balls and we want to keep them as safe and as healthy as we can.
     
  13. Daddy Jack's Mommy

    Daddy Jack's Mommy Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    How did it go for both of you?
     
  14. Amina&M'row

    Amina&M'row Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2019
    To answer the other part of the original question, yes; it does get easier. And then becomes routine. The first month after M'row's diagnosis Dec 30 last year, I was stressed just beyond belief. Just keep on keeping on, and someday soon you will wake up to realize that, astonishingly, your kitty is doing pretty .good and so are you!
     
  15. Kris & Rasmus

    Kris & Rasmus Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    It gets easier, I promise. Rasmus was diagnosed about 4-5 weeks ago and with a lot of failed attempts and trying and trying, and bribing with treats :))) I can now test him whenever I want. He doesn't seem to mind.
     
    Elizabeth and Bertie likes this.
  16. Hales + Comet

    Hales + Comet Member

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2019
    Sorry i didn't update things got crazy with school. it went really well his numbers were low but not to low and he started at 131. The vet told me he has a really high chance of going into remission and we lowered his dose to 1 unit. She said we shouldn't be surprised if after the curve this week we lower it again. also he has his appetite back and is acting way more his usual self
     
    Daddy Jack's Mommy likes this.
  17. Kris & Rasmus

    Kris & Rasmus Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2019
    That's amazing news!
     
  18. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2016
    Does it ever get easier? It got easier the minute you joined our group. The stress will always be there, there are a lot of things you need to be vigilant about but the fact you just didn't give up says a lot. I got a lot of "advice" even from people who had cats when we had our first diabetic cat, they thought this would be too much trouble and all the poking wouldn't be fair to the cat. Imagine if cats could talk, "So you're just giving up? Thanks for nothing". I got lucky with two agreeable and low maintenance cats one of which would jump on the table when I would thump it even though he knew what was coming. You're doing great.
    However as a few other members have already said your vet is dead wrong about not testing every day. This is often the hardest part, disagreeing with someone with a degree on the wall. Comet is your cat and a test is just that, a test.
     
    Daddy Jack's Mommy likes this.

Share This Page