Frustrating article on FD by a DVM

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (The Main Forum)' started by krazy4kritters, Mar 3, 2018.

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  1. krazy4kritters

    krazy4kritters Member

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    Jan 18, 2018
  2. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

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    Bingo
     
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  3. krazy4kritters

    krazy4kritters Member

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    Jan 18, 2018
    My thought exactly!
     
  4. Smokey and Jessica

    Smokey and Jessica Member

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    Feb 8, 2018
    So much of this drives me crazy!
    I can see why might be hesitant to advise some people to home test, but most people are perfectly capable and they should appreciate that. It’s not right in my opinion but I can at least see where they’re coming from. But for the actual vet to not approve of curves is just insane. How can you have a career taking care of animals and then put them at risk like that?!?!? I hope no one ever has deal with a vet that is as careless as this. Personal opinion or the money aspect can be dealt with but this person is just DANGEROUS.
     
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  5. Tracey&Jones

    Tracey&Jones Well-Known Member

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    Dec 12, 2016
    An interesting read. I don' agree with all the points but can see their point of view.
     
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  6. Tanya and Ducia

    Tanya and Ducia Well-Known Member

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    o_O do you really can see their point of view?
    Please tell me - what is it?
    Does it have anything to do with the "Do No Harm" pledge?

    The article is infuriating.
    Fits well into my theory that once your indebted your MD ( or a vet) you can get him do whatever you want. A reminder: a healthy patient is as good for a clinic as a dead one - so, what do we do? We keep our patients not completely well and keep them coming back ($$$). (Just make sure you cannot be sued. )

    Home testing= no Fructoseamine test income. An educated pet car giver = >your earnings.
    Keep them , the CG dumb = higher income for a vet (or MD).

    The highlighting Chris made above is a spot on. ...without a payment... That's all the vets (MD, too) are about - the payment.
    That's how the med textbooks are written - $$$.




     
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  7. Sean & Rufus

    Sean & Rufus Well-Known Member

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    My vet is on the other side of that spectrum. I begged her to give Rufus a fructosamine test multiple times, ultrasound, send in test for cushings. She refused saying it was a waste of money. Equally frustrating on that side of it too! She has a huge ego, where she doesn't need to test for things, cuz she already knows the answers o_O:rolleyes:
     
  8. Tanya and Ducia

    Tanya and Ducia Well-Known Member

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    have you noticed a halo over and above her head?
     
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  9. Sean & Rufus

    Sean & Rufus Well-Known Member

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    Hhaha no. I could list all the things she was wrong about, but I don't want to shame her. I'm in a weird spot right now, and probably will be switching vets.
     
  10. Sean & Rufus

    Sean & Rufus Well-Known Member

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    This is the same lady who told me he didn't have dental issues since September. Look at my ss after Feb 14th when he had dental done.
     
  11. Tanya and Ducia

    Tanya and Ducia Well-Known Member

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    Feb 25, 2017
    He he he, trade one weird place for another?.. Good luck!
    ;)
    My vet told it was good for Ducia to eat high carbs dry "free feeding" mode and start at the higher insulin dose...lol.. totally barbaric given he was educated at the a top Us vet's school.. :joyful::joyful:
    Sigh...

    Thank you FDMB for educating me!:bighug:
     
  12. Sean & Rufus

    Sean & Rufus Well-Known Member

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    Jan 10, 2018
    My vet got so mad at me for suggesting things that I read on here. She called me and told me she was frustrated with me and sent me to a specialist. Best thing that could have happened. But now I'm in limbo of who my vet is. I love my old vets, but when they found out Rufus was diabetic one of them said "well I did that twice, never again". I thought that was a pretty rude and unsettling thing for a vet to say to somebody who cherishes their furry friend. But Rufus has some issues and I'm tired of explaining to vets what's going on. Don't know where to go from here.
     
  13. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

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    If you like them and want to keep them, I'd have no problem at all talking to this vet and telling them how this statement made you feel. They might not realize that some of their "musings" might effect their client in a negative way.

    Just a quick "I've always liked you as a vet, but I really just need to get this off my chest....I don't know if you realize it or not, but when you said "never again", it really bothered me......" kind of thing. Then go from there.

    Most of your decisions on treating the diabetes you can get from the people here, but if you still want to keep your vet involved, I'd definitely try talking to them about how it made you feel.
     
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  14. CalicoHaley

    CalicoHaley Member

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    Mar 2, 2018
    Yeah, there was definitely a more tactful and empathetic way of saying what they meant. E.g., "I've had a few diabetic patients in the past and walked away feeling unable to care for their specific needs, and feel your friend would be better suited with someone else who has more experience with diabetic patients. Would you be willing to be referred?"

    Like.... it's not that hard. I'm sorry they were so blunt.
     
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  15. Sean & Rufus

    Sean & Rufus Well-Known Member

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    I kind of think she was blunt about it because he had been going there for 12 years and we were pretty close. We knew each other, and I think it just kind of came out of her mouth like she was speaking to a friend. I'm sure she had no ill intent, but the relationship with the her got weird after I went for a 2nd opinion back in Sept. It's a long story, but there are 2 lady vets there and 1 of them kind of shuns me now, but I do like the other one. But in all honesty, I kind of blame the old vet and my current vet for Rufus getting diabetes. He was put on steriods and never should have been, or tested more frequently for his BG which never was. If he would have had dental done back in Sept this might have never happened.
     
  16. Tracey&Jones

    Tracey&Jones Well-Known Member

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    Dec 12, 2016
    May have been a bad choice of words but I do see some of his points yes. Not all cat parents are willing to put in the time and effort that is suggested by the board. I had one friend that told me she had a diabetic cat that she had for 10 years and never tested ONCE! She thought I was nuts for doing what I do with Jones. So in cases like those as per his article :"Hyperglycemia is always better than hypoglycemia. The latter can be fatal." So can I see his point of view on that one....yep. If a pet parent only wants to shoot and not test.

    I see the point of the B12 shots and treating other diseases (which would of helped @Sean & Rufus out extremely)

    Treat other diseases. The most commonly associated diseases are chronic pancreatitis (50 percent incidence in newly diagnosed diabetic cats) and periodontal disease. After the diagnosis of diabetes is made, I recommend a urine culture and feline PLI1 as minimum diagnostics after the MDB (CBC, chemistry profile with electrolytes, FeLV/FIV test, urinalysis).

    I see his point with the diet suggestion if not the dry food part.

    Diet. A low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet is superior to others. Canned products have definite advantages, but most diabetics do well on dry products with this formulation. If the cat is reluctant to change its diet, gradually mixing in the new food is recommended.


    I don't agree with not doing a curve - that is same as shooting blind to me however him not requiring his patients to come and do one weekly (which we have all read stories here like that) was eye opening coming from a vet.


    As for home testing:
    he stated "The home-testing approach generally results in the owner’s making dosing decisions based solely on blood glucose readings. (See Principle No. 5.) I realize that it is not always intended, but it does happen. Principle 5 being Monitoring clinical signs is vital in achieving and maintaining regulation. With few exceptions, if the clinical signs and the blood-glucose level conflict, believe the clinical signs.​

    I don't see his point that the numbers need to be discarded but as stated here time and again "How is kitty doing otherwise? Is the 5p's in place? Kitty is more than their numbers." So I can see some of his point of view on this.

    And even though he didn't advocate for home testing he did finish his article with a discussion on home testing and if those numbers could be trusted.

    Kathryn Sener, founder of the Diapetic Rescue care kit, says pet owners’ reluctance is temporary. Veterinarians who promote home testing typically train the owners to use a syringe, she says, and the Diapetic kit is used by some technicians to show customers how to help manage the disease. Owners learn to safely dispose of needles, test glucose through either urine or blood, and even give a honey stick to quickly raise low blood sugar.

    Can veterinarians trust the readings of a non-professiona
    l?​

    The results are a “close number,” Sener says. “What they are is a good guideline of what (glucose levels) are at and how the customer’s pet is feeling.”



    And from a business point of view this statement "the former puts you at risk for the consequences of some potentially poor decisions, and the latter does not make economic sense." is valid. Whether any of us like that concept or not - they are running a business and there is legal liabilities as to running that business that they will try to limit. Every business does this...including healthcare for humans as you pointed out. A good customer is a repeat customer.

    I don't think that one point above takes everything away from the article however.












     
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