HELP! Cat being aggressive with toddlers and I'm exhausted and brokenhearted

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (The Main Forum)' started by MamaBear1, Dec 15, 2017.

  1. MamaBear1

    MamaBear1 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2017
    Hello. I have a 12 year old cat who found us when he was just a kitten. He has been a wonderful pet. He was diagnosed with diabetes about two months ago. He is on Vetsulin. He seems better but not 100%. He feels bad so he has become aggressive with our toddlers. If they so much as even bump into him he attacks them. They are pretty good about leaving him alone (really I'm not just saying that) and have learned to give him his space but being toddlers sometimes they knock into him or forget and walk too close to the chair he is sitting on. Just today my youngest dropped his ball and it rolled into the cat so the cat attacked him scratching less than an cm from his eye. Frankly, I'm exhausted and out of money trying to treat the cat. We have four kids and unfortunately have a finite amount of resources. I've spent hours on the board and internet trying to understand how to control his diabetes on a budget but I'm not having much success. I have a glucose meter but can't ever get enough blood to get it to work correctly. The last time I tried six times before he tried to bite me. I don't know what to do. At this point, I'm thinking finding him a new home (one without kids) would be the best option but I feel terribly guilty. Has anyone else ever been in a similar situation? What did you do?
    We are in the front range of Colorado.
     
  2. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    This is a thread I posted earlier this week.
    http://www.felinediabetes.com/FDMB/threads/behavioral-issues-with-cat-getting-worse.187984/
    Unfortunately for you my problems are cats only. Months ago another member had to take her kid to ER (scratched eye) and got the full guilt treatment from her family and the nurses. I've heard of Prozac being used on horses and cats. I don't mean to be condescending but showing the cat that "You're the boss" only works for a short period of time. I have chased cats through the house with a water bottle when I've been pushed too far and I mean really pushed.
    Treating a 12 year old cat who has probably led a life of leisure and now you're poking him with something sharp everyday might have something to do with it. Is he taking it out on the kids? Has he seen a vet lately? It could be a coincidence that for example he needs dental work, an abscessed tooth will make him miserable and he's at the right age. Hopefully it's something as simple as that.
    Promise me you'll keep posting, NO ONE here will give you guilt or grief.
     
  3. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    Sorry, meant to say "Prozac being used on horses and dogs"
     
  4. Sharon14

    Sharon14 Well-Known Member

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    Aug 16, 2015
    Sorry you’re going through this! Sometimes felaway can help, but it sounds like he’s not feeling well yet. Prozac is also used on cats not sure about horses though. Anyway we can help you with the testing. You may need a larger lancet, 25-28 gauge. Warm the ear well, poke 2-3 Times in quick succession and then milk the ear from the base towards the poke spot. Also are you feeding enough? Many vets have you feed 2x/day, but I found my cat got cranky with that and his numbers are better now that I feed multiple times a day.
     
  5. Tanya and Ducia

    Tanya and Ducia Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 25, 2017
    What an extremely difficult situation that is for you!

    I wonder if one of our members @Stephanie & Quintus has any ideas for you...
    She mentioned once attending cat behaviorist classes, if I am not mistaken.
     
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  6. Bron and Sheba

    Bron and Sheba Well-Known Member

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    Feb 21, 2015
    You sound like you are exhausted.... I am so sorry. It is hard to cope with anything when everything gets on top of you:bighug::bighug::bighug:

    While you sort things out, can you keep kitty in a separate part of the house?
    I think I would ask the vet if you could swap o a different insulin like Lantus or levemir. They are longer lasting and more gentle insulins and he might feel better having one of those. He might feel much better on a gentler insulin.

    That is great you are wanting to test. Keep trying!
    Have you seen the link to hints to testing? Here it is.
    Always make sure you give kitty a low carb treat when you test, even if you don't get blood. I used to give Sheba the treat while I was testing and it distracted her while I was doing it.
    http://www.felinediabetes.com/FDMB/threads/hometesting-links-and-tips.287/

    I used a feleway collar for Sheba and thought it helped calm her. It was another brand, not felaway but it worked.

    As Noah and me said , please keep posting. No one will judge you. We want to help you to sort it out.:bighug:
     
  7. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    What Sharon said: Feliway has worked near miracles for some people. Does your vet have you on a strict schedule that is not realistic. We/Us/They have some rules that are common sense and others that are unrealistic for some people and can be stretched pretty far. "The giving of the food" is one of those rules. Now I'm giving you medical advice I'm not supposed to be doing that but feed me proportioned meals just twice a day and I'd take a swat at someone too. Try and keep your sanity through the weekend and hopefully a lot of people will chime in.
    If you're a good enough person to raise kids, help your cat and spill your guts here you deserve a little compassion and maybe some answers. I really wish you the best.
     
  8. donnalea

    donnalea Member

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    Jun 18, 2016
    Please don't give up. Once he is feeling better and the kids get used to him, he will be their best friend. My granddaughters loved dressing our cats in doll dresses and wheeling them around in doll buggies and a wagon.
     
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  9. Stephanie & Quintus

    Stephanie & Quintus Member

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    Dec 9, 2017
    This is a difficult situation. A lot of "fixing" behaviour issues requires quite a lot of patience and involvement from humans around.

    For the blood, or any other disagreable stuff: always surround it by "nice" things. Quintus loves being petted, so it's easy. I pet him, and at some point I move towards the ear, pin it half a second to prick it, let it go and continue petting. With the other hand I put the needle away, turn on the glucometer, etc. Just giving you this as an example of the general guideline.

    If you have a cat who is food-motivated, treats can help.

    If the behavior issue is due to the cat being ill, the first step is to cure the illness... Are you certain it's the diabetes which is making him aggressive, and that there is not something else?

    If a healthy cat is "attacking", then usually (after checking for illnesses) one would look for sources of stress. Can he go outside? Does he have enough stimulation or activity? is the environment suited to his needs? Is it stressful for him to be in a home with lots of young kids? If so, is there a way to provide him "kid-free" space or moments? It would be worth consulting a behavior specialist, but they don't come cheap, at least in my part of the world.

    It is possible that you are not in a situation right now where you can care for your cat. This happened to a friend of mine. Luckily her mom was able to take the cat in. It must be extremely difficult to be feeling at the end of your rope and not being able to give him what he needs.

    I don't think there is a magic solution for your situation. You have a cat that has a demanding illness and is obviously not reacting very gracefully to feeling crappy. You have many other demands on your time, energy, and mental space. You are the only one who can know where to set priorities, where your limits are, what you can and cannot do.

    In your post I hear a lot of frustration, and I think there is probably a lot of grief behind it. Hold space for your grief. It will help you figure out what the best solution here is for you.
     
  10. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    Me again, sorry, scattered thoughts. I just went over your post again and saw "I've spent hours on the board and internet trying to understand......" Now that you've officially joined you should post questions in Feline Health to begin with as opposed to just trying to understand. Jump in with both feet!
     
  11. Tanya and Ducia

    Tanya and Ducia Well-Known Member

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    Feb 25, 2017
    I want to second Noah & me post: reading thru somebody else's posts is not the same as to discuss your cat's individual needs with ppl with experience - whether it's insulin type and dosage or a lancet holding technique or a psychological ones like his need for a space or a time alone.
    I really liked reading this - many kids I assume would not do that.
    I hope things improve for you.
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2017
    Reason for edit: spel error
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  12. JanetNJ

    JanetNJ Well-Known Member

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    Jun 8, 2016
    Feliway may help.

    As far as testing, which meter is it? Some require more blood than others. What size lancet? If it's the 31 gauge ones that come with human meters it's too small. You want 26-28 gauge lancets. I have a video in my signature showing how I test my cat CC.
     
  13. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

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    Jun 16, 2014
    I second this suggestion. Vetsulin can make some cats feel really lousy.


    Mogs
    .
     
  14. Squalliesmom

    Squalliesmom Well-Known Member

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    Jun 26, 2015
    As Mogs said, Vetsulin really can make some kitties feel crummy. My own cat was fine with it, but I know of others that were not. I know finances are difficult for you right now and the longer-lasting insulins usually cost more; you can get them much cheaper if you buy them from Canada (Marks Marine is very popular here) or, sometimes, you can find them for a lot less in our Supply Closet.
     
  15. JeffJ

    JeffJ Well-Known Member

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    Jul 7, 2016
    Cat claws - I would check these too, to make sure there are no ingrown claws. If they grow too long, they can curl back and get into the paw pad.

    Teeth - if his teeth have issues, he could have a permanent infection or headache, making him irritable (just like in humans).
     
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  16. shelaghc

    shelaghc Member

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    Jun 28, 2017
    I'm so sorry your sweet kitty is having these problems and that it's giving your family problems as a result. I'm still fairly new here and can't say much about the insulin issues, but I do have some practical and low-cost ideas to deal with his aggressive behavior.

    The fastest and simplest solution to help with all the scratching would be to get his claws trimmed. The vet's office can do this very easily. Some charge a small fee, (generally about $10) but under the circumstances they might be willing to forgo that cost.

    Trimmed claws can last as long as six weeks - sometimes longer depending upon the cat. And that will save your kids' skin immediately.

    And while I do agree about Feliway - it's not cheap by any standard. But some vets have samples that might help. It can be found in spray form or those little plug-ins that go in an electrical outlet. Most people put those kind around where their cats eat.

    Another idea to help - although not ideal - is to give your kitty a time-out room. Do you have a room that he could go into for short periods of time - as much as half an hour if necessary? Something like a powder room where you can dim the lights for a while and let him have some quiet time. One of my civvy kitties gets overly aggressive with my sugar baby Jester and as gently as possible I pick him up and set him in the bathroom with the lights off - usually about five minutes for him. When I open the door, he's happy and purring again with a totally unfluffed tail and no memory of why I put him there.

    But the quickest solution to your kitty being aggressive with your kids really is to trim his claws ASAP. He can't scratch if his claws aren't there.
     
  17. Kris & Teasel

    Kris & Teasel Well-Known Member

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    Aug 17, 2016
    Some good advice here. :)
     
  18. MamaBear1

    MamaBear1 New Member

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    Dec 15, 2017
    Wow! Thank you so much for all the replies. I was feeling really desperate yesterday and didn't know where to turn for support. I don't have much time this morning before my littles wake up but wanted to first THANK YOU and second answer as many questions as I can. Yes he has been to the vet lately. The doctor couldn't get a good look into his mouth but said a cleaning would be good. Unfortunately, it's out of our budget. I forgot to mention that he also had fatty liver disease in the spring. We banned together as a family (we also have two teens in addition to the toddlers) and syringe fed him for weeks. He recovered and everything was well until the diabetes showed up. But all the tests and vet visits the last six months have been SO EXPENSIVE and we just can't continue to pour money into him. That's why I've been trying to self-manage his diabetes and also why a teeth cleaning (or a behavioral therapist) is not possible right now.

    Someone asked if we are feeding enough. I don't know. I've been sticking to the 2x a day rule laid out by the vet bc I thought I had to. His aggression does seem food related because after he eats he doesn't mind the toddlers at all. I'm going to try feeding a few more times a day and see if that helps.

    I've not heard of Feliway. I'll look into it. Thank you.

    We are visiting my relatives later this week. My grandpa uses Lantus and his insurance gives him more than he needs so he said I can have a bottle to try. It is the same one I've read about on the message boards right? There isn't a different pet Lantus?

    The meter we use is the inexpensive one from Wal-mart. I'll check the gauge on the lancet. Thanks for that reminder and the video is really helpful. If I could get the blood sugar thing down that would lift a big burden.

    We do have a place for a time-out room. I think he would actually like that.

    His claws were trimmed about a month ago I should probably look into doing it again.

    Now here's the HARDEST part...I'm just really exhausted. All of these suggestions are wonderful but reading through them I starting to feel overwhelmed. Someone mentioned frustration and guilt...YES YES YES. While money is a limited resource so is my energy. I work from home part time, homeschool one of my teens, help the other teen prepare for college, and take care of two toddlers (2 and 3 years old). We also have a senior pug who is in relatively good health and a youngish lab. Neither of them require a lot of work per se but they don't care for themselves. Despite the busyness of caring for my people and pets, I try really hard to keep a lot of margins in my life so I can be available to those in need including my cat. But to be honest, I'm finding myself wearing thin these days and inside I'm starting to ask myself if the cat is worth it. I feel HORRIBLE just typing that out. My husband and homeschooled teen have been helping and I'm grateful but I keep wondering if it's going to get easier. The blood sugar monitoring is exhausting. Our mornings are crazy with little ones running around, dogs needing to be fed, teens getting started...etc and then trying to check his blood sugar amidst the morning chaos sometimes just feels like too much. Is there going to be a time when he just requires a few shots a day and that's it? Right now I'm cleaning his litter boxes so much because he still pees all the time. Thankfully once he started insulin he stopped having accidents...for awhile I was cleaning up puddles of pee everyday. And the constant monitoring of him and the toddlers is exhausting. He was very tolerant until he got sick and I get it. I have some health issues of my own and when I feel bad I also lash out. I have a feeling the kitty is probably being pretty tolerant considering how he feels. Sorry for the rant. I know I'm not the only one who is busy in life and plenty of people are more busy and manage to keep all their plates spinning with less frustration than me. It's just where I'm at right now. We've considered finding him a new home but I really want to teach my kids that we stick with our loved ones to the end. It believe it is part of our duty as human beings to care for the earth and all that is in it. It's just well...hard sometimes but I guess hard is what builds character right. Anyway thank you for the suggestions and for listening to my rant. I feel better getting it out.

    I don't have a lot of time to spend on the message boards but I'll do my best to keep everyone updated. THANK YOU!!!
     
  19. JanetNJ

    JanetNJ Well-Known Member

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    Jun 8, 2016
    If you start home testing it will eliminate the need to go to the vet for tests and curves. Once I started home testing my cat it was a year before she went for a vet visit. Home testing supplies (although laying out the money initially is costly) is MUCH cheaper then springing for $150 a month at the vet.

    I'm glad you have the relion... that's what many here use. If it's the relion Prime, that takes a bigger blood sample then the Relion Micro or Confirm (the Prime requires a sample twice as large as the other two meters) so you may want to switch meters. If it's the lancets that came with it, they are 31 gauge and too thin. Go back and ask for a box of 26-28 gauge. they are about $5 for 100.
    Definitely feed more. Unregulated diabetic cats need more food then they would usually need because they can't utilize the nutrients in the food properly. feed before each shot and a mid day meal and late night meal. this may help with the grumpies! (Oh wouldn't that be an easy fix!)
    You do have a lot on your plate. Toddlers are HARD... esp. 3 year old! Lord help you. haha As women we tend to want to do most of the work ourselves... but remember it's ok to delegate. it's ok to tell the older kids and husband you need help cleaning, feeding, scooping boxes, cooking, ect. You can't burn the candle at both ends. and add the holidays on top of it with shopping, decorating, wrapping, ect. Make time for a glass of wine, coffee, chocolate... what every your pleasure it... a funny movie... a long bath... something to distress. I can certainly relate to what you're saying and I don't even have my hands as full as you. (I'm a teacher and have 6 cats and 1 5 year old). Don't wait until you are about to lose it to decompress. you need to find a way to charge up your own batteries.
    I promise that once you get the routine of the testing down, I literally take 1 minute or less to do an ear test in the morning, 1 in the evening, and 1 before bed. Once her ear is bleeding easily it's a snap. It takes a total of 3 minutes of my day. Good idea to teach your older kids how to test as well in case you need them to. Give your cat a special low carb treat he loves at test time to get him to learn to be cooperative. For me it was deli turkey, ham or roast beef.

    remember that this hard time is temporary... as soon as you get the numbers lower, and he's feeling better, things will improve. We are here if you need help or just need to vent! ((hugs))
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2017
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  20. Stephanie & Quintus

    Stephanie & Quintus Member

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    Dec 9, 2017
    Good idea!

    It's the same one. Do be careful though because it doesn't act quite the same way as faster-acting insulins. You'll want to be monitored closely by people on the board. I've been at it for two weeks and am only just trying to feel in control of things (check the spreadsheet in my signature). AND I live alone and have a rather "peaceful" life aside from a job that keeps me away long hours. And I was ill all last week, therefore have been able to monitor my cat much more closely than I would normally have.

    I'm not saying this to discourage you -- but I'm realising that caring for a diabetic cat is a lot of work.

    Definitely go for it. It will at least ease the pressure.

    That is the main vibe I got from your post. Not wanting to diagnose from afar but you sound like somebody who is on the verge of burnout. With both money and energy ressources being scarce, maybe you are not in a place right now where you can adequately care for your cat. (Again, not trying to discourage you, but my rule #1 is to be realistic.)

    You know, even I have been asking myself this question regarding Quintus. I look at what I'm putting myself through, and him, too, and I wonder if I'm going to look back on it and regret it, or not. So far, my answer is "it is worth it". But that is for me and my particular situation. My cat is the only being I live with.

    It could happen. He could also go into remission. But based on what I've seen (bear in mind I've only been around here a week or so) it does take a lot of work to get there, over weeks, months, and sometimes years.

    I agree with you that we stick with our loved ones. But sometimes, sticking with a loved one can mean getting them the help we are not able to provide them. To be clear, I am not telling you that you should rehome your cat -- only you can make that decision and know if it's right for you and your family. Rehoming is also work, particularly if you want to find a solution nearby, for example, or a temporary solution until you have the energy to pick things back up again.

    But remember: put on your own oxygen mask first before helping others.

    It must be an exceedingly difficult situation to be in, and very sad to contemplate that you maybe cannot do for your cat what your values tell you to. Take a moment to stop and accept the "sad".

    Now, to try and be solution-oriented: your teens helped out with the syringe feeding. How attached are they to the cat? How much could they help with learning to measure blood glucose, giving the insulin injections? Or even, doing online research -- depending on the age of your home-schooled teen, and interests, maybe doing a crash course on FD and treatment could be part of the curriculum? (Don't know much about how home-schooling works so no idea if this is realistic.)

    Do you have a friend, neighbour, or family neighbour who can help out? You don't have to do all this alone.

    Lots of hugs.
     
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  21. Stephanie & Quintus

    Stephanie & Quintus Member

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    Dec 9, 2017
    I'd like to second that. A week ago I really struggled with testing. Now I get blood in half a second, the reading with another five, and we're done. Three things happen: ears bleed more easily; you get better at handling the cat (less coercion, more coaxing -- the thing they hate most isn't the prick, it's the constraint and fiddling with their ears, so if you can reduce that, it makes life much easier); your technique improves.
     
  22. Sharon14

    Sharon14 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 16, 2015
    You do have a lot on your plate! Kudos to you for giving this a shot! It’s good you have a room for time out. One thing you can do is get a auto feeder like this
    https://www.amazon.com/PetSafe-5-Me...UTF8&qid=1513435537&sr=8-3&keywords=Petsafe 5
    Put it in the time out room along with a litter box and a cozy bed and he will have a safe room to go to when he feels like getting away. I did this with my cat and he loves his room now and stays in there a lot, even with the door wide open. Be sure toddlers know the room is off limits, maybe keep the door open only enough for the cat to get in and out.
     
  23. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

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    Jun 16, 2014
    It does get easier. It will take a little while but keep faith; you'll soon sort out a routine that works for you and your household. As others have said above, it typically gets progressively quicker and easier to do blood tests (more capillaries will form at the test sites and your technique will improve with practice). To optimise regulation and, most important of all, to keep your kitty safe there's no skipping the need for BG testing but, all going well, it will become a very quick part of your kitty's daily routine. (Note: It really saves time if you can set up a little 'test station' with all the bits 'n' bobs ready to hand!) With better regulation the amount of peeing should reduce so you'll no longer be a 'slave to the litter box'.

    Again I would wonder just how steep a drop in BG levels the Vetsulin might be producing in your kitty. With some cats Vetsulin can really tank BG levels early in the cycle - typically anywhere between +1 and +5 hours after insulin - and big drops like that can affect mood, behaviour, and GI tract. I also wonder whether the twice-daily feeding routine might be upsetting your kitty's GI tract? It might help you to note how many hours after the injection is given that you notice him getting aggressive. Also, has he started throwing up at all between feeds?

    So many here will recognise and relate wholeheartedly to such feelings. I'm glad you have found FDMB; it's the perfect place to get the support you need. I don't know what I would have done without the emotional support I have received from members of this wonderful community (it counts every bit as much as the education I received here).

    :bighug:


    Mogs
    .
     
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  24. donnalea

    donnalea Member

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    Jun 18, 2016
    If you have a hectic time getting pets fed and everyone up and going, you could change the time for testing and shot. We give Callie her test, food and insulin while the dogs are out going potty. The she gets to her room while the other cats get fed. Once all the critters are taken care of, my hubby and I can have a nice relaxing breakfast. Sometimes just moving the diabetic pet's care an hour or two, one way or another will give you a break. Just try to stick with the same time every day.
     
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  25. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    Any change yet?
     
  26. MamaBear1

    MamaBear1 New Member

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    Dec 15, 2017
    Hi. Like I said I’m pretty maxed out so I don’t have much time to be on here. We are traveling right now. Sunny is with us. He LOVES to travel. Rights on the console between my husband and I. There hasn’t been a lot of change in his attitude except for enjoying a long car ride. He did bite my husband on the ear last night while we took him into the hotel. He hadn’t been fed and it was all too much I think. It did break skin and upset my dh but we are all good now. My grandpa is going to give us a bottle of Lantus tomorrow. I’ve been reading up on the Start Low Go Slow protocol and feel prepared to start it. Here’s a cute pic from this morning.
     

    Attached Files:

  27. MamaBear1

    MamaBear1 New Member

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    Dec 15, 2017
    THANK YOU! You hit the nail on the head. Many days I do feel like I’m on the edge of a burnout. I really appreciate your compassion regarding this difficult situation.

    Today is a good day. We are going to give the Lantus a try. Hopefully we’ll see some improvement. I’m not going to give up yet!
     
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  28. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    He looks pretty adorable! I've had two that loved being in the car like a slobbering dog. Maybe you could get a little Winnebago for him, the neighbors would love that.
     
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  29. MamaBear1

    MamaBear1 New Member

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    Dec 15, 2017
    Ha! We lived in an RV full time for four years traveling all over and he LOVED it. We do have an Airstream and he’s always up for adventure. He’s a super cool cat. Honestly I was never really a cat person until he found us in a parking lot and wouldn’t stop following and meowing at us. He was a kitten and nothing but skin and bones. My heart couldn’t just leave the poor creature so we took him back home to my parents house in Indiana. I called every shelter within a 4 hour radius but no one would promise me they wouldn’t euthanize him. So a day later he came back on a plane with us to California. That was almost 13 years ago. :)
     
  30. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    I solve all my problems with childish humor! Maybe your husband will understand, most men do. Seriously though, it's odd he's such an Angel in the car.
    barbie_camper.JPG
     
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  31. Tracey&Jones

    Tracey&Jones Well-Known Member

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    Dec 12, 2016
    Love the pic...yes, can I get a low carb tuna with a small low fat latte?
     
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  32. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

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    Dec 3, 2016
    Be serious Tracey, this is no time for Canadian "humour". Mama Bear, have you looked at the Feliway yet? I'm usually skeptic of these things but a lot of people have had good results. Going shopping for old-persons home now, bye.
     
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  33. Tracey&Jones

    Tracey&Jones Well-Known Member

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    Dec 12, 2016
    Sure Mr. Barbie Van, I will get serious...LOL.

    I have used the feliway, can't say it works but I know when the diffusers are out. I am willing to bet once his FD is more regulated and he feels "less" hungry all the time that things will improve.

    Mama Bear, these are for you. :bighug::bighug::bighug:
     
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2017
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  34. Stephanie & Quintus

    Stephanie & Quintus Member

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    Dec 9, 2017
    Going slightly OT, but having recently been there myself I would urge you to take the risk of burnout seriously. (The non-OT part is that if your kitty is going to be taken care of you need to be in decent functioning order!)
    This test is the "gold standard" for evaluating burnout risk. It's geared towards burnout at work, and I can't remember if you work or not, but if you "don't", I'm pretty sure you know what stands for work in your life... right? Taking it and seeing the numbers gave me a kick in the pants to be careful, slow down, stop, dump stuff that could be dumped, and put myself first more.
    I'm hoping Lantus helps for your kitty! I've been on a bit of a roller-coaster with my old boy Quintus over the last two weeks but things are already better :)
    There is a lot of experience and expertise here to help you.
     
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  35. Noah & me (GA)

    Noah & me (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2016
    That's not much to talk about but it happens. One cat or a dozen, everyone has their limit. :blackeye::(
     

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