Home testing technique questions

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (The Main Forum)' started by achrisvet, Jun 29, 2011.

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  1. achrisvet

    achrisvet New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    I'm a veterinarian about to jump on the recommending home testing bandwagon and have some basic technique questions.

    Do most people hand hold the stylets or use the automatic device?
    What gauge stylet is best?
    Is it necessary to actually hit that little ear vein or is the goal capillary bleeding?
    I've read that you can use paw pads as well. I've used the accessory carpal pad in a big dog with success. Which pad do you like in the cat? Do you find cats tolerate ear pricks better? ( I know ECID)
    Do you know of any particularly good online videos to which I can refer clients??
    Which meters do you use? Why do you prefer the meter you are using? Price of meter and strips? Ease of use?

    Thank you for your input.
     
  2. squeem3

    squeem3 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009

    Great that you will be recommending hometestingn to your clients :thumbup

    Some use the lancet device, others freehand the lancet. It just depends on what you are most comfortable with and can get a good drop of blood with.


    Don't use the very fine gauge lancets (31, 33, etc). They too fine to get a decent amount of blood with. 28 gauge is a good size. Some people use 30. Here's a chart that lists popular brands of lancets and what size they are: http://www.walgreens.com/marketing/library/centers/diabetes/lancets.jsp

    For the lance device itself, most starter kits include one. Some brands work better than others, IMO. I liked the AccuChek SoftClick lancet device. I tried the AccuChek MulitClick one but it was a little too fat for me to hold comfortably. The generic CVS brand lancet device is impossible to use so don't use :-Q

    You don't need to hit the vein. Between the vein and the edge of the ear is fine. Here's a picture: http://i106.photobucket.com/albums/m267/chupie_2006/testingear/sweetspot.jpg


    I think you use the largest pad on the pad. The ear is more easily accessible so that's why most people use it :smile:

    There's a list of videos here: http://felinediabetes.com/FDMB/viewtopic.php?f=14&t=287


    I started with the AccuChek Advantage. It was an ok meter. It took a loong time (well, 30 seconds I think) to give a reading and it needed a large amount of blood (1ul). I switched to the AccuChek Aviva and loved it :D So easy to use, gives a reading in just a few seconds, test strips sip up the blood right away. A very cat-friendly meter :smile: The test strips are pricey, though, about $30 for a box of 50 but shop around online for the best prices. I got the starter kit for free from a promo offer but I've seen the starter kits on sale at the pharmacy for as little as $10.
     
  3. KarenRamboConan

    KarenRamboConan Senior Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Hello, and welcome! I'll try to tackle the questions one at a time.

    1.
    You will get a divide on this, but I think most people freehand the lancets. I know I do - I have more control, and my cat doesn't like the "click". But either way is just fine.

    2.
    I tend to use a 28. I want a 31 gauge for my needle, of course, but to get a poke big enough to bleed, I find the 28 gauge lancet to be good.

    3.
    Capillary. Most glucometers are calibrated for capillary blood, not venous. If you do hit the vein, don't worry - and newbies get a bigger blood drop that way. But with time, you will a good size drop with the poke between the vein and the ear's edge. Just remember - warm the ear first! Makes a huge difference. Rub gently only, and resist "milking" too much - you want to avoid hemolysis of the sample.

    4.
    I have always used ears, as do 90% of our members, so I'll leave that one for a paw tester! ;-)

    5.
    Absolutely! I had two diabetic kitties, and neither minded the ear pricks (after I got good at it, of course!), and would purr throught the testing. I now use the ear to fill micro capillary tubes for testing my IMHA cat's PCV. Gently "pinch" after to stop bleeding and prevent bruising, and try not to hit the exact same spot each time, or the ear will callus.

    6.
    There are several. My favourite is : http://www.sugarcats.net/sites/harry/earprick.html#anchor144779

    7.
    Again, you will get various answers - especially since this is a global board, and different countries have different meters (and insulins!) I love the One Touch series - easy to use, sipping strips, and a small drop of blood. Meters are dirt cheap here in Canada, but strips tend to be expensive. I guess you could simply advise using the ones that sip blood and use small drops. Other than that, it's a personal preference. I know someone (Hope?) did a lovely comparison of meters a while back for accuracy, etc., and I'm hoping someone more wide awake can post the link for you. I do know that my One Touch always tested VERY close to my vet's lab values, so we were satisfied.

    Hope that helps. Thanks for asking! :smile:
     
  4. Jill & Alex (GA)

    Jill & Alex (GA) Senior Member Moderator

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    good for you!

    it's a matter of preference. i prefer using the automatic device with a clear cap. the clear cap allows you to see where you're poking. the automatic device also allows you to exert some pressure which i find leads to getting blood more easily.

    imho, newbies are most succesful when using a larger gauge stylet (25 - 28 gauge) when learning to test. as the kitty's ear learns to bleed and the caregiver becomes more experienced, switching to a finer gauge stylet is probably more comfortable for the cat.

    i aim for the capillaries:

    [​IMG]


    i value my fingers too much to try testing alex's paw pads. however, others have found testing paw pads to be easier than ears. i'm sure they'll chime in.
    my cat will jump to her testing spot when called. the only time she has balked at tests or shots has been when she was ready to go off insulin (she's been off twice. currently back on insulin for the third time in the past 5 years).

    i think you'll find the answers to this question and more here: Hometesting Links and Tips

    i've tried several brands of meters. i prefer the Freestyle meters. the freestyle lite requires no coding, small sample size, and the new test strips are forgiving. i've also found freestyle meters to be the closest to the AlphaTrak and blood serum chemistry analyzers in the 50 -100 range. as i practice tight regulation, accuracy in the low range is important to me. 50 strips cost about $26 -$27 if purchased online. less if you can find them from a reputable seller on Ebay.

    many here use the ReliOn meters which can be found at WalMart. the ReliOn meters and test strips are a low cost alternative.

    hope this helps...
     
  5. Karen & Smokey(GA)

    Karen & Smokey(GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Vet sent me home initially with a box of 25ga Monoject needles to free-hand poke. They poked the
    vein at the clinic, I guess because you can always get blood from the vein and you don't have time to
    mess around getting the capillaries to bleed. It's reliable to get blood in a clinic setting.

    But I found hand-holding the needles sometimes I would not poke deep enough and sometimes too deep,
    also they seemed to hurt Smokey.

    So I switched to the AccuCheck Soft Clix lancet device that came with my AccuCheck Advantage meter.

    It took a while to learn how to aim and position it to the correct area. You must have really good light !

    I found that with that one I had to dial to the deepest setting and even then sometimes I would not get
    blood. Smokey had one tough ear ! Perhaps the SoftClix lancets are too small gauge...they are only
    available in one gauge as far as I know, and they don't state on the package. The lancets are not
    'standard' and you must buy their brand. I found the branded ones worked better than the generic ones I
    bought from Hocks.com (they fit, but seemed to be inconsistent in length).

    I preferred the way the Soft Clix works, because you can re-cock it one-handed, which was often necessary
    with Smokey (continue holding the ear with one hand and re-cock/re-poke with the other hand).

    So I switched to the Reli-On lancet device, with 'fine' (not ultra-fine') lancets. It was then that I started
    getting blood pretty much every time. But I did not like the way it works as well. You must use both hands to re-set
    the device, but holding it in one hand and using the other hand to pull a plunger that is at the back end. Fortunately, Smokey
    would just sit on my lap waiting for me to re-cock the thing, if I needed to make a second attempt.
    With Smokey, I still had to set it on the deepest setting. Every cat is different.

    Recommend people start on a middle setting and work from there.
    You just have to figure out what works best for your cat.

    Not the smallest gauge, usually. Especially for starting out.

    Not desirable to hit the vein. Meters are designed to read capillary blood.

    While some here do paw-poke, this is not desirable because of the danger of infection from the litter box.

    Answered by others

    I used the AccuCheck Advantage, the same meter my vet used in 2009. May be discontinued by now.

    I know AccuCheck still makes meters, like the Aviva.

    Meter I got at the pharmacy for around $70. Pricey but I wanted to be consistent with my vet. Strips
    I bought on-line from Hocks.com 3 boxes of 50 at a time. I think they ran around $80-$90 for 150 strips.
    Not the cheapest.

    I liked that you could put the strip in, but not all the way. If you just set the strip in, prop the meter
    upright. The poke, and when I got blood, quickly reach over and push the strip all the way in....meter
    turns on. Then pick up the meter and sip the blood. This is good because if you turn the meter on too
    soon, it can 'time out' before you get the blood. This a often a frustration for newbies, wasting a lot
    of strips because the meter times out.

    I did not like that the meter had to be coded with each new package of strips. A little 'key' (micro-chip)
    had to be inserted into a slot on the meter with each new box of strips. Don't forget to do that or
    your strips won't match the code and results could be inaccurate.

    You're welcome.
     
  6. tuckers mom

    tuckers mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Love that you're doing this research. I'll leave out some of the questions since you already got great responses.

    Do most people hand hold the stylets or use the automatic device?

    - I prefer automatic device.

    What gauge stylet is best?

    - When I just started out, the one that worked best for me was by One Touch, I prefered the clear cap for the reasons Jill mentioned. I switched last year to the One Touch Delica lancet device which uses a fine guage, I think a 31g, it has a smooth strike and is much more comfortable for my kitties.


    Which meters do you use? Why do you prefer the meter you are using? Price of meter and strips? Ease of use?
    - Ease of use, I like the Accu Check Aviva, sips fast and rarely gets an error code, lots of time to get more blood if needed; for pricing I like the Walmart Relion; I currently use the Bayer Contour USB meter because it does not need batteries and I can simply recharge it every few months as needed.
     
  7. Karen & Smokey(GA)

    Karen & Smokey(GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    You didn't ask but here are a couple more tips for testing:

    WARM THE EAR :

    Put about 1/4 cup of uncooked ordinary white rice (not 'instant' rice, not brown rice--it goes rancid)
    into the toe of a thin-ish sock and knot or sew it shut. Cut off the excess sock.

    Heat the rice sock in the microwave approximately 20 seconds. This is an estimate for a 100 watt microwave oven. You should heat for 1/2 the time, moosh it around in your hand, then heat for the remaining time. Adjust total time according to your microwave oven.

    It should be very warm. Hold it to your own cheek---you should be able to comfortably keep it there for several seconds.

    Warm kitty's ear by holding the warm rice sock first on the outside, then on the inside. alternate inside and outside the ear every few seconds. A total of about 30 seconds is usually enough to warm the ear sufficiently. Test ear warmness by putting your own cheek against the ear, or kiss the ear (my favorite method).

    Use something other than the rice sock as a backer when pricking for blood. Use a folded tissue, or folded cosmetic square, for example. The backer should be disposable, since they sometimes get soiled with blood from a
    'poke-thru'. Hold the backer firmly on the backside of the ear and place the lancet device firmly against the target area. After getting the test blood, you can fold this same tissue over the edge of the ear and apply gentle pressure to stop bleeding and prevent bruising at the test site.

    VASELINE:

    To help the blood drop bead up and keep it from spreading into the fur, smear a very small amount of
    Vaseline on the edge of the ear. Wipe off as much as you can so that the fur just looks a bit slick.
    An application in the morning will usually still be enough for the rest of the day.

    You only need to make the fur look just a bit shiny. Use the smallest amount possible.
     
  8. Phoebe_TiggyGA_NortonGA

    Phoebe_TiggyGA_NortonGA Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Quote:
    Do most people hand hold the stylets or use the automatic device?
    What gauge stylet is best?
    Is it necessary to actually hit that little ear vein or is the goal capillary bleeding?
    I've read that you can use paw pads as well. I've used the accessory carpal pad in a big dog with success. Which pad do you like in the cat? Do you find cats tolerate ear pricks better? ( I know ECID)
    Do you know of any particularly good online videos to which I can refer clients??
    Which meters do you use? Why do you prefer the meter you are using? Price of meter and strips? Ease of use?
    -----
    I like the automatic device
    I use these: $1.49 per 100ct http://hocks.com/hocks-healthcare/hocks ... 10030.html
    capillary - between the vein and edge of the ear
    I don't use paw pads - my first diabetic cat had very ticklish feet -- ears were the only option
    I'll let others recommend videos
    I tried Walgreens TrueTrack -- BAD!! too much blood needed and lots of errors / wasted test strips
    I have used Maxima AST and now Infinity (replaced AST).
    Price is great - $16.50 per 50ct http://hocks.com/hocks-healthcare/hocks ... MAX50.html
    first meter is basically free when you buy 100 test strips.
    Ease of use: Tiny amount of blood needed, sipping action test strips

    To get free shipping from Hocks, I generally order 2-3 months worth of supplies. (syringes, lancets, test strips)
    I am anti-Walmart.
     
  9. Hillary & Maui (GA)

    Hillary & Maui (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    I'll add my 2 cents - if freehanding the lancet, I found inserting at an upward 45 degreeish angle worked best for me to poke and draw blood. Here is a pic of what I'm describing:

    [​IMG]


    and if the cat has dark ears - like my Maui does, then using a flashlight will help to focus on where you poked and to see the blood pooling. I used a small handheld light in my teeth (to keep my hands free) and guided it like a spotlight.
     
  10. MommaOfMuse

    MommaOfMuse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
     
  11. Vicky & Gandalf (GA) & Murrlin

    Vicky & Gandalf (GA) & Murrlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Whether to freehand or not is probably the biggest obstacle for newbies learning to hometest. I hated the device as I am very hands on - I want to feel what I'm doing. The device felt like I was stabbing him. So it's freehand for me and I recommend it to anyone who sounds like they are having trouble with the devices.

    The key to meters is small blood droplet. I believe the Reli-On Wal-MArt brand is good for that, as is the Accu-check Aviva which is what I use. The main factor when deciding on meter for some people is cost of strips. The "higher end" brands don't work any better than lower end models (In fact the Reli-On got one of the highest ratings among meters by Consumer Reports) and the costs of strips could be prohibitive for some people wanting to take on home testing. And unless someone is comfortable buying on Ebay, the cost for Reli-On strips is the cheapest to buy in stores. However, since there are now people who make a business of buying unused strips from diabetics whose insurance plans inundate them with strips, the costs on Ebay have increased.

    Hope that gives you a good in-the-trenches perspective!
     
  12. Larry and Kitties

    Larry and Kitties Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    - I am a fan of using the lancet pen. On my first diabetic, I tried freehand but the cat move when the lancet was in the ear and the ear ripped a little and there was blood all over. The lanced pen is controlled so you know how deep your are going and can adjust the depth.
    - To me, the key was to very firmly backup the ear where you poke. If you do not firmly backup the ear, the ear will deflect and not be adequately be penetrated.
    - Of the eight or nine diabetic kitties I have had, I never had problem getting blood fro the ear. However, at first it was difficulty getting it from the small ears on my Scottish Fold Twigie.
     
  13. jaimiesm3

    jaimiesm3 Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2011
    Motor and I test his feet. I tried the ear and got bit and a whole lot of screaming. His ears are really sensitive.

    I've been playing with his feet his whole life so he's used to Mama "buggin" his feet. He's not fond of the stick, but he's willing.

    I have the Freestyle Lite. I love it! SMALL amount of blood and it's quick.

    I'm using the lancet spring. It has a clear cover and I can see where I'm aiming. Since it's his foot I can use the added pressure from the cap to get it right.

    Thanks for doing this! My vet didn't suggest home testing, but they seem to like that I'm getting numbers!
     
  14. laur+danny+horde

    laur+danny+horde Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Answered for my 4 diabetics (2 fosters):

    Do most people hand hold the stylets or use the automatic device? we freehand

    What gauge stylet is best? we use 33 gauge since we know how to "milk" the ear for blood nowadays, but initially with our first diabetic (Danny), we needed a larger gauge. The most important part of obtaining blood, though, was a really warm rice sock.

    Is it necessary to actually hit that little ear vein or is the goal capillary bleeding? Avoid the vein to avoid a gush of blood. Poke between the vein and the edge of the ear. My Danny is the model for the 'famous ear' pix, and actually I don't believe in the "sweet spot" any more. I base this on the ear vessel structure -- there is no vein identation on the right ear to match the indent on the left ear which was called the "sweet spot". Now I poke all along the front and back edges of the ear, from the fold upwards. This greater testing area allows me to poke where ever it's handy at the moment (depends on how the cat is positioned), also it spreads out the poking.

    [​IMG]

    I've read that you can use paw pads as well. I've used the accessory carpal pad in a big dog with success. Which pad do you like in the cat? Do you find cats tolerate ear pricks better? ( I know ECID) When I was trying to learn how to poke, I tried the foot pad when I could not get the ear to bleed. Danny didn't like his foot being messed with, so I went back to the ear. Never tried pad testing ith the others.

    Do you know of any particularly good online videos to which I can refer clients?? here is a testing slideshow of Danny and Cole. http://s196.photobucket.com/albums/aa31 ... 6cb105.pbw

    Which meters do you use? Why do you prefer the meter you are using? Price of meter and strips? Ease of use? I use Relion Micro's, primarily for low cost and ease of strips purchase. The bigger Walmarts tend to have strips available in a shelf vending unit for when the pharmacy is closed. I tried the newer Relion Confirm but didn't really like it (too big) so when it died, I bought another Micro instead. Strips are like $40 per 100, and the meter was maybe $9.

    Thanks for spreading the word on hometesting! It's such an important tool for managing FD.

    laur
     
  15. cjleo

    cjleo Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Again, thank you so much for being interested in hometesting - the lifeblood of diabetic cat care.

    Do most people hand hold the stylets or use the automatic device? I freehand all seven of my guys
    What gauge stylet is best? I start with 28 and move to 30 or 31. I do have one cat that the first test with a 30 was too big. She bled all over everything. I use a 33 gauge lancet for her. She is just different.
    Is it necessary to actually hit that little ear vein or is the goal capillary bleeding? I am for the capillaries near the edge.
    I've read that you can use paw pads as well. I've used the accessory carpal pad in a big dog with success. Which pad do you like in the cat? Do you find cats tolerate ear pricks better? ( I know ECID) Never tried paws
    Do you know of any particularly good online videos to which I can refer clients??
    Which meters do you use? Why do you prefer the meter you are using? Price of meter and strips? Ease of use? I use AccuChek Aviva for each of my guys. Since I use it as a human diabetic, I have the software to download each of their meter memories to my computer. The Aviva feels good in my hand and allows me to test quickly. It is small, fast and forgiving in that you have time to grab a second drop. The support from AccuChek is great - just register the meter for a human. They don't do cats :D

    Hope this helps,

    Claudia

    Thank you for your input.
     
  16. Vicky & Gandalf (GA) & Murrlin

    Vicky & Gandalf (GA) & Murrlin Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    I'd like to add one more thing about ear testing - it's very important to put pressure on the spot you poked for a few seconds afterwards not only to stop the bleeding but also to prevent bruising. Use a damp cotton ball or tissue to absorb the excess blood off at the same time. Many of us have been testing our cat's ears for years and you would never realize it by looking at their ears!
     
  17. achrisvet

    achrisvet New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Thank you everyone for your very helpful replies. I have read them all and will go back over them taking notes. One thing I may have missed - what was the brand of lancet device that has the clear cap?
     
  18. MommaOfMuse

    MommaOfMuse Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 26, 2010
    The Lancet device that I got with my Relion Micro meter has the option of either a black cap or a clear cap, however the downside of this particular device is that it doesn't have a depth setting.

    One thing I do have folks do that I teach to test their cats is I have them try out the device on themselves first so they can see first how little it hurts and second to be able to adjust the depth setting to the lowest point that will draw enough blood.

    Mel, Maxwell, Musette & The Fur Gang
     
  19. doombuggy

    doombuggy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2011
    Dr, we use the Relion in our home as well. Prices I have paid are about the same as what others have quoted me. My mom works for mcKesson and would have gotten a meter & stips for me, but since I don't live near her anymore, I felt this was the better option (unfortunately, she can't sell me syringes!)

    I follow the poking procedure for the ear, but sometimes I have rotten luck. I heat up his ear (although I burned the rice sock Lori sent me the first time, set on 15 seconds in my 1100 watt microwave...) and use 28 gauge lancets freehand (I buy them at Target, as they have a "cap" that will go over the needle when you are finished). Since I am no longer injecting insulin, I still have my biohazzard container on the counter for the lancets. I bought it at Wal-Mart for a few bucks.

    Cedric is pretty good about getting pricked, even when it takes me awhile. I have not tried his paws, and guess I won't have much success...I have enough trouble when trying to trim his nails. A co-worker has a diabetic black cat, and she uses his paw pads to test. I am hoping to get her to come on to this site, as I sent her some links last night after speaking to her about injection sites for the insulin.

    Thanks for hanging around with us and hope you are recovering from your surgery!
     
  20. Karen & Smokey(GA)

    Karen & Smokey(GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Several brands have the clear cap for the lancet device. Some come in the meter kit when you
    buy it. Some you have to contact the manufacturer and ask to be sent one. Read the instruction leaflet
    carefully and sometimes it will say. If a meter says 'alternative site testing', this usually means a clear
    cap is included.

    One I know for sure is the SoftClix by AccuChek. The SoftClix device comes with all the different AccuChek
    meters, as far as I know.

    I'll let lori (and tom) know you have this question...she handles a lot of meters (she sends out
    the newbie kits).
     
  21. achrisvet

    achrisvet New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    I was just looking at the videos on the FreeStyle Lite website and saw the clear cap option. I don't know why you have to use the opaque cap for the finger stick, but, whatever. From what I can see, the FreeStyle lancets are 25 gauge, which seems thick to me, especially since it needs such a small drop. Do you know if other brand lancets will fit the FreeStyle device?

    We have a cheap Walgreens' lancet device at work. If the smaller gauge lancets will fit the Freestyle device I'll get one of those for work. We use 28 ga there.
     
  22. LynnLee + Mousie

    LynnLee + Mousie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    I use the Freestyle lancet device and have used probably about a dozen different brands of lancets in the device, so other than maybe a couple brands that have their own specific design, yes, many other brands of lancets will work in the Freestyle device.

    (someone can probably tell me, there is one lancet device that takes lancets that are in a little drum type thing? which one is that? that one obviously won't work in the freestyle device)

    if you'd like, i think i have half dozen or so of the freestyle lancing devices, new of course, and could send you a couple if you want. i've developed this obsession about them as i'm afraid mine is going to stop working at any time and since my Mousie is feisty, i need to have a spare on hand 'cause there's no way she'd let me poke her by hand, and instead, have collected several. LOL!! needless to say, i think i'm using the same one i started with back in 2006 so I could spare a couple.
     
  23. 1 - I hand hold the stylets
    2 - I tried 33g but had very little luck getting blood, even with 2 or 3 pokes. I now use 30g lancets and hit it right the first time 90% of the time. That improves with experience as well as using a larger gauge lancet.
    3 - you have to (or should) hit the area between the vein and the edge of the ear rather than the vein itself. I've only hit it directly a couple times, and it takes a bit longer to get it to stop bleeding, plus the meters are designed to use capillary blood rather than blood right from the vein.
    4 - I've never tried using paw pads. I was told by the vet tech that it was an option, but you had to be careful and pay close attention to the paws because of danger from infection due to litter box use.
    5 - There are supposed to be some great videos which I'm sure other people have given you links to. My connection speed (or lack thereof) makes it nearly impossible for me to view videos or stream anything.
    6 - I use a Relion Micro. Works great, easy to learn how to use, and very low cost compared to others, especially the cost of the test strips. Plus every town in the world has a Wal-Mart now, so they are easy to find!

    I think is is fantastic that you are going to start recommending home testing and treatment! It will save untold numbers of diabetic cats. Many people can afford home testing, and far too many choose to have a pet "put down" due to financial constraints. Home testing, while life-consuming at times, saved my Bob's life. I won't say my vet forced it on me, but she did a great job of making me realize that it was possible and it was the best thing for my cat. She was right.

    Carl in SC
     
  24. achrisvet

    achrisvet New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    O you are so sweet to offer, but that's OK. I am so amazed by the kindness of people on this board.

    I think it's Accucheck that makes the lancet in a drum thingee. I've read so many pages in the last few days that my head is buzzing, but I think that's right.
     
  25. squeem3

    squeem3 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009

    The AccuChek MultiClick lancet device uses a drum that is loaded with 10 lancets inside.
     
  26. Patty & Champ

    Patty & Champ Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 6, 2011
    The AccuChek multiclix lancet device is very good. That's what I use. You turn the top of the device to have the drum turn to use a new lancet. I only do that first thing in the morning, basically using the same lancet for the entire day and starting fresh each day. My cat has never complained!! He doesn't mind the click the lancet makes and the one-handed operation is great if you have to poke a second time.
     
  27. Karen & Smokey(GA)

    Karen & Smokey(GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    The AccuChek lancet device (not the one that uses the drum), has their own
    shape of lancets and other brands cannot be used in the device.

    Hocks.com does sell a cheaper version to fit the AccuChek, but I found them to be
    inconsistent in length and I prefer the brand-name AccuChek ones. But they
    don't tell you on the box what the gauge is.
     
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