New 09/01/2020

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (Welcome & Main Forum)' started by Angela McNally, Jan 9, 2020.

  1. Angela McNally

    Angela McNally New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2020
    Hello can anyone advise me with a problem I have with my cat Smudge
    He is 12 years old and was diagnosed diabetic 14 months ago.
    He is now at a good weight 4.4 and his diabetes is stable but he is always starving
    And I mean really starving. I feed him 1 & 1/4 156 gram tins twice a day of Hills WD prescription. 12 hours apart then inject him with 3 mu of insulin but he is always scavenging fir food and he has even taught himself to take lids off saucepans so nothing can be left lying around. We can’t eat around him as he tries to steal some so he has to be put out. can someone recommend a wet food that might fill him but without putting on any weight. He’s always really stressed which is not good for him or us
    Thank you
     
  2. Lisa and Witn (GA)

    Lisa and Witn (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    It sounds like his glucose levels may not be under control. Can you tell us what insulin you are using? Are you home testing? Also is the W/D canned, dry or both?
     
  3. Angela McNally

    Angela McNally New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2020
    Hi he’s on Prozinc and wet food, dry food doesn’t agree with him. Also his thyroid has been checked and is ok. I’m in Great Britain and apparently we don’t home test here, I asked so every month he has a fructosamine test and a glucose curve test done.
     
  4. Lisa and Witn (GA)

    Lisa and Witn (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    I believe we have several members on this site from Great Britain that home test. Unfortunately, it is something most vets don't advise their clients to do or worse, try to discourage them from home testing. However, this is the best way to determine how well the dose is working and also if it is safe to give the insulin. By testing before every shot, you will have your cats glucose levels and know if it is safe to give the dose. If the glucose level is too low and you give insulin, you risk your cat becoming hypoglycemic. This is very dangerous and could be deadly. It means the glucose levels have dropped too low.

    Also, by knowing the glucose levels you will be able to determine if the dose needs to be adjusted by either increasing or decreasing it. Most of us don't even consult our vets for making dose changes because we have more data to make that determination. Don't worry, this is something we can help you with and learn to do. Home testing means testing a drop of blood with a glucose meter. You can use either a human glucose meter or a pet one. It is your preference, however, human meters are less expensive since the test strips for pet meters can cost a lot more. Here is a link that will give you more information on home testing. http://www.felinediabetes.com/FDMB/threads/hometesting-links-and-tips.287/

    This will also save you money by not having to take him to the vet every month for the fructosomine test. Also, glucose tests done at a vets office are not always accurate. Stress can significantly increase glucose level and most cats do become stressed when they visit the vet. By testing at home, you will get more accurate readings. You will also be able to do your own curves.
     
    Jennifer R. likes this.
  5. Angela McNally

    Angela McNally New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2020
    Thank you so much I’ll check this out. It has cost us a small fortune so far but it has to be done.
     
  6. Red & Rover (GA)

    Red & Rover (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2016
    Wendy&Neko and Jennifer R. like this.
  7. Deb & Wink

    Deb & Wink Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2013
    How's it going Angela?
     

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