Number stuck in the 300's with 2 units

Discussion in 'Caninsulin / Vetsulin and N / NPH' started by Kerstin, Sep 19, 2017.

  1. Kerstin

    Kerstin New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    So I am hometesting Sam as much as he allows and he seems completely stuck in the 300's. He was upped from 1 u to 2 u about 4 weeks ago.
    I am wondering if I should call the vet and see if she is willing to switch him to PZI or Lantus? His diet consists of FF, Tiki cat and Fussie cat, all at 0% or under 4% carbs.
    I really want to get the glucose down and get him into remission.
     
  2. Tuxedo Mom

    Tuxedo Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2014
    One thing that is very important is to be testing before EACH shot to see where the numbers are preshot. This is to make sure that the number is safe to shoot and to give a starting point so that you can tell how well the Vetsulin and dose are working. If you are able to get more tests in earlier in the cycle...around +2-+5 you will be able to see how the Vetsulin is working. Vetsulin is a faster acting insulin and usually will have an onset around +2 with a nadir (peak action) around +4 -+5. Glucose numbers do not stay the same throughout the day and insulin action is not linear...it can change through the day and vary day to day, so it is important to be doing regular testing to see where the highs and lows are. Once you have more information you can make a call whether Vetsulin is the right insulin.
     
    Yong likes this.
  3. Monica Lewis

    Monica Lewis Member

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2017
    Hello Kerstin,
    just looked at your SS but don't seem to see many AM and PM preshot numbers..? It would be very helpful if had them to see the whole picture of Sam's journey.
    Preshot testing is also a MUST in order to keep Sam safe knowing what these numbers are so you can adjust the dosage accordingly if necessary before shooting him 'blindly' with the same dose every day without testing first.
    We've been on Vetsulin for 5 months and we had a promising start but not getting consistent readings and lower PS numbers so together with the vet ( and the helpful ladies on the board..) we decided it was time to switch insulin and going to move onto ProZinc next week.

    I realise that now that no matter how desperate we are to get our kitties into remission it will take time and quite ofter our sugar kitties love surprising us with totally the opposite response of what we were expecting from them!:banghead: :cat:
    You seem to be doing the right thing by feeding the right food and testing regularly but it is very important to see those pre-shot numbers in order to be able to make a well informed decision on whether to change the dose or change the insulin..
    Good luck!:)
     
    Yong likes this.
  4. Kerstin

    Kerstin New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2017
    Thank you, Sam is incredibly hard to test and the tests I am currently getting done only happen because my Mom is visiting, no clue how I can manage in 2 weeks when she is gone until December. My work schedule is pretty tight so Sam get's Insulin at 4.30 am and 4.30 pm. I discussed the numbers with the vet and she wants him on 3 units or wanted me to stop free feeding him. I decided to narrow it down to 2 meals a day, we started on Friday, the numbers are still not budging....
     
  5. Kris & Teasel

    Kris & Teasel Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2016
    I suspect that the whole unit increase in dose was too much. It can set them up for a rebound reaction that drives the BG higher. We call it bouncing. It's possible the the good dose is somewhere between 1 and 2 units.
     
  6. JanetNJ

    JanetNJ Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    Sometimes too much insulin can look like not enough. Remember no food at least 2 hours prior to the preshot test. Other than that, let him eat. Give a special treat he likes but only gets for a test.... It will make him more receptive to testing.
     
  7. JanetNJ

    JanetNJ Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2016
    And don't forget it's a marathon. I didn't even see a yellow number until I was about 8 weeks into giving insulin.
     

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