Senior diabetic cat with IBD

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (The Main Forum)' started by KimKim, Nov 14, 2018.

  1. KimKim

    KimKim New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2018
    Hi everyone,

    This poor guy is stuck in a foster house with 20 cats - and he's a people cat, NOT a cat's cat. He's been on Lantus and prednisone for at least a year, and doing very well. But he lives "alone" in an enclosed porch.

    I decided to foster him because I work at home and can pay attention to him. However, the food he's been eating (hills science diet z/d) is not being manufactured any more.

    He'll need to be transitioned to something else; the vet recommended Purina focus Rx.

    I'm starting to wonder if this is a good decision for me. I tend to assume the worst -- and that I'll be dealing with crazy BG levels on top of IBD flares and cleaning stuff off of carpets (I don't own this house!)

    It also really bothers me to feed a cat this type of crappy food and would be willing to make homemade. But Smokey is 15, his condition is well managed and do I really want to consider messing with that?
    I was told that once to make a change and find it doesn't work, that going back to status quo often doesn't work like it used to.

    Should I transition him to the Purina focus and just be done? should I then start at least reducing the Purina by adding homemade? I was told that once to make a change and find it doesn't work, that going back to status quo often doesn't work like it used to.

    We already know that reducing his prednisone messed with his blood sugar; the current foster and vet tried that just a few weeks ago.

    I guess I'm asking: at what point do you just do what the vet says?
     
    Last edited: Nov 14, 2018
  2. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2013
    Have you seen the site IBD Kitties?

    The usual key to IBD is finding a protein source that your kitty can tolerate without making the symptoms worse. The only real way to do that is through some trial and error.
     
  3. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2013
    LOL....this made me giggle.....A lot of us are here because our vets were so useless in helping us with our sugarcats, so I doubt if you're going to hear very many of us say to "just do what the vet says"
     
    KimKim likes this.
  4. KimKim

    KimKim New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2018
    Looking through that site now (and tomorrow, and the next day...)

    Protein is always the problem with IBD?

    He's 15; trial and error can take months - years. Do you do that to a 15 year old cat that is happy and comfortable right now?

    Oh I get it about vets! My last cat had kidney disease and all of the inappetence and stomach issues that go with it. I went through quite a few vets to find one that was sensible (and had her own cat with kidney disease)
     
  5. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2013
    Well, if he's also diabetic, we have to stick to mostly protein because you sure don't want him eating grains, potatoes or other "fillers".

    Cats are also obligate carnivores, designed to eat meat......a raw diet is probably one of the best things you can do for both his IBD and his diabetes

    Usually what helps most is trying a "novel" protein....a meat he's never eaten before like rabbit, venison, buffalo, quail, even kangaroo!

    15 isn't really that old…..My own cat is going on 19 and has been diabetic for over 5 years.....these kitties can be very resilient!
     
  6. KimKim

    KimKim New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2018
    I've briefly looked into the raw diet and found that raw diet can cause some IBD to get worse, or to cause malnutrition due to inflamed intestines not being able to absorb nutrients. No one knows this cat's complete history so we don't know what symptoms of IBD he's had, what testing, etc.

    The cause of IBD isn't known, certain foods, not just proteins, exacerbate it.

    Why is hydrolyzed protein preferred for IBD?

    Why is a novel protein a good thing to try?
     
  7. Maggies Mom Debby

    Maggies Mom Debby Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    Question. Is it IBD-D (diarrhea) or -C (constipation)? That can make a difference in food choice and treatment.

    As to novel proteins, some common foods (beef, chicken, fish) are known to be allergens for some cats. A unique protein sometimes helps if that’s part of the problem.
     
  8. KimKim

    KimKim New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 14, 2018
    Oh boy. Just came back from another vet visit. No 2 vets say the same thing. This last one changed this IBD/diabetic cat to Purina DM and added fortiflora. He's now on 2 antiobiotics - clovinia (sp?) for an infected toe, and metrodiazole for possible bacterial overgrowth (Poops that smell like sewage, flatulence, diarrhea).

    Does anyone else sense a storm coming????

    At least the rescue is on board with the raw diet (the veterinarian as well, but a big no to the novel protein!)

    Right now, his glucose was 279 at the vets office, I did started mixing some DM with the Z/D and I'm waiting to the rescue to "okay" which brand of raw food to pick up today.

    What brand of probiotics do you all use?
     

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