What are the odds?

Discussion in 'Welcome to the Group - Post an Introduction Here' started by Tim Pilot, Feb 16, 2015.

  1. Tim Pilot

    Tim Pilot New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    Hi everyone,

    We had the worst possible week last week, not one but TWO of our three wonderful Siamese cats have been diagnosed with diabetes and both are still at the vet hospital recovering from dehydration and pancreatitis.

    How could this happen? Genetics, parasite, tainted food?

    Looking forward to hearing from you all in the other forums.

    Thanks,

    -T
     
  2. Larry and Kitties

    Larry and Kitties Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    I say genetics and maybe the the food you fed them contributed to it.
    Were they overweight and did you fed dry?
     
  3. phlika29

    phlika29 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2014
    Hi and welcome. Sorry to hear you have two cats that are unwell! Poor you.

    I read that Burmese cats are more prone to diabetes. Perhaps Siamese are aswell??

    In addition to food contributing they haven't both been on the same medication such as steroids have they?
     
  4. rhiannon and shadow (GA)

    rhiannon and shadow (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    food and treats seem to be very key. I gave mine too many treats and sent her over the line.

    I think Siamese may have a genetic predisposition.
     
  5. BJM

    BJM Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Both infection and pancreatitis are known to raise glucose levels.
     
  6. Maggies Mom Debby

    Maggies Mom Debby Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    I also had siamese siblings who both were diabetic. I believe it was genetic. I even did search to see if Siamese as a breed have a genetic tendency towards diabetes, as I have had 3 siamese diabetics. But the only breed I found with a proven risk are Burmese.
     
  7. Tim Pilot

    Tim Pilot New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    The cats are 11 (male) and 12 years (female, mother of the male cat) old, have been eating dry (Petcurean NOW and NOW Senior for the last 3-4 years) and wet (Wellness Chicken, Chicken Herring, Turkey, Turkey Salmon). Treats (Temptations) were limited to a few per week.

    Male was slightly overweight but never went over 15lbs , Female cat was about 10-11lbs, steady as well. Their recent weights 12.5lbs and 8.5lbs respectively.

    Waiting to find out which insulin we'll be giving, but the BG levels have dropped while they're at the vet hospital. Some liver inflammation(?)

    Do any of you have pet insurance? Did you have a positive experience with the insurance companies or have some/all of your claims denied?

    The different vets we've spoken too are astonished that both cats both have been diagnosed with the same conditions, but none have an idea of what may have caused this.

    Thanks for the feedback everyone.
     
  8. rhiannon and shadow (GA)

    rhiannon and shadow (GA) Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2012
    try 35% carbs for the senior food..... I just looked it up and did the calculation.....
    there's the answer.... sorry..... ( that's probably the equivalent as feeding those treats but for meals instead)

    grain free is misleading to many people..... because it doesn't mean carb free.....

    http://scheyderweb.com/cats/catfood.html

    De-boned turkey, potato flour, peas, pea fibre, whole dried egg, potatoes, tomato, flaxseed, apples, canola oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), alfalfa, de-boned salmon, de-boned duck, natural flavour, coconut oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), lecithin, carrots, pumpkin, bananas, blueberries, cranberries, raspberries, blackberries, papayas, pineapple, grapefruit, lentil beans, broccoli, spinach, cottage cheese, alfalfa sprouts, dicalcium phosphate, calcium carbonate, phosphoric acid, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, DL-methionine, taurine, vitamins (vitamin E supplement, L-ascorbyl-2-polyphosphate (a source of vitamin C), niacin, inositol, vitamin A supplement, thiamine mononitrate, d-calcium pantothenate, pyridoxine hydrochloride, riboflavin, beta-carotene, vitamin D3 supplement, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement), minerals (zinc proteinate , ferrous sulphate, zinc oxide, iron proteinate, copper sulphate, copper proteinate, manganese proteinate, manganous oxide, calcium iodate, sodium selenite), dried kelp, L-lysine, dried chicory root, dried Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product, dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product, dried Aspergillus niger fermentation product, dried Aspergillus oryzae fermentation product, yucca schidigera extract, yeast extract, L-carnitine, marigold, dried rosemary.

    Click here to view a complete glossary of our ingredients, including those used in our senior cat food.
    Crude protein (min) 30%
    Crude fat (min) 14%
    Crude fibre (max) 5%
    Moisture (max) 10%
    Ash (max) 6.5%
    Phosphorus (min) 0.6%
    Magnesium (max) 0.1%
    Taurine (min) 2800 mg/kg
    *Omega 6 (min) 2.6%
    *Omega 3 (min) 0.52%
    Calorie Content: ME (Calculated)= 3571 kcal/kg or 393 kcal/cup
    Microorganisms (min) 90,000,000 CFU/lb (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Enterococcus faecium).
    *Not recognized as an essential nutrient by the AAFCO Cat Food Nutrient Profiles.
    NOW FRESHâ„¢ grain free Senior Cat recipe is formulated to meet the nutritional levels established by the AAFCO cat food nutrient profiles for
     
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  9. BJM

    BJM Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    If you have pet insurance, look at the policy. If you don't have it, its too late to get something to cover diabetes, as it will be a pre-existing condition.
    Liver inflammation - when there is not enough insulin to use the glucose, fat gets broken down for calories. It goes to the liver to be processed. Too much fat going to the liver swells it and can interfere with its function.
     
  10. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Hi Tim,

    I'm very sorry to hear that two of your three treasures are poorly. :( You have found a great place to learn about and get help for both diabetes and pancreatitis.

    Saoirse is insured (we're in the UK). I had no problems with claiming for her treatment (including ultrasound, hospital stay, blood testing, insulin, vet consults, B12 injections, the works).

    Here is a link to the IDEXX treatment recommendations for pancreatitis. I found it very helpful.

    I hope your little ones feel better very soon.

    :bighug:
     
  11. phlika29

    phlika29 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 14, 2014
    Hi

    We recommend that cats with diabetes are feed a low carb wet food. So less than 10% of calories from carbs.

    This website has fantastic information about food and a great chart of foods that may be suitable. Ofcourse changing foods can reduce the blood glucose and hence the amount if insulin needed so we recommend changing slowly and monitoring blood glucose when you do.

    http://www.catinfo.org
     
  12. Tim Pilot

    Tim Pilot New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    Thanks for the website links (especially the nutrition calculator).

    When I called Petcurean's nutrition specialist phone number to let them know what happened, they (of course) denied the diabetes could be caused by their food, but they were quick to recommend to stop feeding our cats the NOW Senior diet. Way to go "Premium Cat Food"company Petcurean!

    Both our kitties seem to be doing better and one is coming home today. By the way, we have a third kitty (11 year old Siamese, daughter/sister to our sick kitties, ideal weight and a little pickier with food) that has not shown any symptoms. Crossing fingers!

    Have a great day everyone
     
  13. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    Hi Tim,

    Glad to hear that your little ones are improving and that one is coming home today. Pancreatitis isn't fun. :( Hopefully the second one will be home with you soon, too. Out of curiosity, did you check your youngest kitty's BG at all to be on the safe side?
     
  14. Deborah & Gadget

    Deborah & Gadget Member

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2015
    I don't have insurance but the good news is that once the initial vet consults and testing are over it doesn't seem like it costs too much to maintain? The insulin costs a lot but lasts a long time and the testing supplies are pretty reasonable since I use Walmart Brand. I'm totally a newbie and just trying to be optimistic! The real investment is the time.
     
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  15. Tim Pilot

    Tim Pilot New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2015
    Update:

    Mommy cat is now home and has had two shots of Lantus insulin. Not a fan of the pills she has to take over the next few weeks. She has an appetite but not as huge as before. Using Vet recommend Purina DM dry and canned (for now).

    Not fully equipped yet to take BG levels. We got the BG/ketone strips for the urine, but no "crystal" litter to capture the pee. Also researching if I can use the Accu-Check BG meter I bought myself a few years ago.

    Third kitty is not eating as much as before, but she's the super picky one and is definitely not a fan of the new food. So crossing fingers she's not crashing like the her brother and mother.

    Stay tuned. Thanks again everyone for sharing your stories.
     
  16. Maggies Mom Debby

    Maggies Mom Debby Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2009
    You can use a ladle to catch urine as she pees, or even stick the strips in the urine stream instead of buying special litter. (This assumes she will let you do it, though!)
     
  17. BJM

    BJM Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2010
    Aquarium gravel may be used as nonabsorbent litter, too.
    See my signature link Secondary Monitoring Tools for more tips, plus additional assessments you may wish to make.
     
  18. Critter Mom

    Critter Mom Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2014
    I bet Mommy Cat is thrilled to be home. Hopefully your other little one won't be far behind her.
     

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