Human glucose meter conversion?

Discussion in 'Feline Health - (The Main Forum)' started by colin72, Oct 1, 2017.

  1. colin72

    colin72 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2014
    Hi

    I have 2 questions that I can't find the answers to (I've searched over an hour).

    1) I'll be using a Relion Micro meter to test my cat. Where can I find information that tells me how to convert the Micro 's "human number" to the "cat number"?

    2) Where can I find information that tells me what the numbers mean... for example, what is a normal/good range and what is too high

    Thank you very much
    Colin
     
  2. TempestsMum

    TempestsMum Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2016
    Hello Colin,
    There is no conversation between human and pet meters unfortunately but most people use human meters. The lower numbers are the most important ones and there's a slight difference in when to be concerned (hypo range).

    If you click on someone's spread sheet you can see at the top the range of numbers is colour coded to make life easier. black is the high end and light green the low end. You should be trying to keep kitty between the blue and dark green (above 5.5). Normal cats without diabetes usually sit anywhere from 4-8 range but you don't want to be seeing anything under 5.5 with a cat on insulin.
     
  3. TempestsMum

    TempestsMum Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2016
    If you look at the colours at the top. the bit you are looking for in world measurements- I'm in the U.K so we use different numbers. :)
     

    Attached Files:

  4. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2013
    Don't bother.....you can't compare the two and you'll drive yourself crazy trying. Most of us here use human meters and our protocols were written with human meters in mind, so that's the important thing. The important thing to know is your "time to act" number....On a human meter, that's below 50. You don't want them dropping below 50 without intervening with some high carb food, Karo/honey/syrup

    Normal numbers on a human meter are 50-120.....that's what we hope to get to, but it will take time. Anything over renal threshold is "too high" but that number varies from cat to cat, but generally runs around 200+

    Above renal threshold means there's so much glucose in the bloodstream that the kidneys can't filter it out anymore and the glucose spills over into the urine.
     
    Cherish Gallagher likes this.
  5. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2013
    Yes...normal numbers (a "good range") is between 50-120

    As long as you understand what "too low" is, it doesn't matter if you're using a human meter or pet one.....With a human meter, if they drop below 50, that's "too low" and you want to get them up

    Too high is too high, no matter what the actual number is.....and anything above renal threshold is "too high"....that can be anywhere from around 200 to above 600
     
  6. colin72

    colin72 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2014

    I have no clue what "Anything over renal threshold is "too high" " means. What is renal threshold? What number is above renal threshold?

    I bought a Relion Micro to check him once in a while. Last night and this morning when I fed him, he didn't eat as much us usual. So I just checked him fore the first time with the Relion Micro (before I try to feed him again) and it said 255.
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2017
  7. Chris & China

    Chris & China Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 10, 2013
    I explained that above

    Renal threshold is the point where there's too much glucose in the bloodstream for the kidneys to be able to filter it out so the glucose "spills over" into the urine. Renal means "kidney"

    Every cat's threshold is different, but it generally runs about 200 (some lower, some higher)

    If his blood glucose was 255, that's probably "too high" and he should probably be on insulin.

    We like to see their blood glucose between 50-120....normal numbers for a cat

    Vets will let their patients run higher than we like to see them because most people won't do the home testing needed to keep them safe, so they'd rather let them run too high than risk the chances of hypoglycemia, but if you home test, you can always keep them safe
     
    Angel V likes this.

Share This Page